Detail View: The AMICA Library: Dlia golosa

AMICA ID: 
CMA_.2002.60
AMICA Library Year: 
2003
Object Type: 
Books
Creator Name: 
Lissitzky, El
Creator Nationality: 
Russian
Creator Role: 
artist
Creator Dates/Places: 
1890 - 1941
Gender: 
M
Creator Birth Place: 
Pochinok, Russia
Creator Death Place: 
Moscow
Creator Name-CRT: 
El Lissitzky
Title: 
For the Voice
Title Type: 
Primary
Title: 
Dlia golosa
Title Type: 
Foreign
View: 
Detail
Creation Date: 
1923
Creation Start Date: 
1923
Creation End Date: 
1923
Materials and Techniques: 
one book containing 61 pages with letterpress designs printed in red and black ink; cover printed in red and black ink; cover printed in red and black on orange paper
Classification Term: 
Bound Volume
Style or Period: 
Russia, 20th century
Dimensions: 
Sheet: 18.5cm x 13cm, Cover: 18.7cm x 13.4cm
AMICA Contributor: 
The Cleveland Museum of Art
Owner Location: 
Cleveland, Ohio, USA
ID Number: 
2002.60
Credit Line: 
Gift of various donors to the department of Prints (by exchange)
Inscriptions: 
inscribed in red ink and dated: Bepe Kongeruhohne (?) og C.M. Cronuwa 8/I 24 (Bepe Kongeruhohre? gave the book to Mark Slonim on January 8th, 1924)
Copyright: 
? 1923 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn
Rights: 
Provenance: 
Bepe Kongeruhohne(?); Mark Slonim; (Mapk Crohnm)
Context: 
The radically innovative For the Voice is considered to be El Lissitzky's most spectacular achievement in book illustration, or "book construction" as the artist described his work. A champion of Russian Constructivism, Lissitzky used pure, abstract forms to express progressive social values and his hope of transforming the world through science and technology on both a private and public level.In his designs for this book, Lissitzky mixed fonts and turned variously sized letters in different directions amidst a cacophony of squares and circles and diagonal, vertical, and horizontal stripes. Printing the image in black and red, he aimed to capture and keep the viewer's attention. Lissitzky's inventiveness extended to the page margins, which are stepped like an address book to form an index to the poems of Vladimir Mayakovsky, the Russian avant-garde author whose voice resounded throughout the 1920s. The collection of thirteen poems is meant to be read aloud-hence, the title.
Related Image Identifier Link: 
CMA_.2002.60det01.tif