Detail View: The AMICA Library: Receiving Surrender from the Eli: from Battle Scenes of the Quelling of Rebellions in the Western Regions, with Imperial Poems

AMICA ID: 
CMA_.1998.103.1
AMICA Library Year: 
2001
Object Type: 
Prints
Creator Name: 
Castiglione, Giuseppe
Creator Nationality: 
European; Southern European; Italian
Creator Role: 
artist
Creator Dates/Places: 
1688 - 1766
Gender: 
M
Creator Birth Place: 
Milan
Creator Name-CRT: 
Giuseppe Castiglione
Title: 
Receiving Surrender from the Eli: from Battle Scenes of the Quelling of Rebellions in the Western Regions, with Imperial Poems
Title Type: 
Primary
View: 
Full View
Creation Date: 
c. 1765-1774
Creation Start Date: 
1765
Creation End Date: 
1774
Materials and Techniques: 
etching, mounted in album form, 16 leaves plus two additional leaves of inscriptions
Dimensions: 
Overall: 51cm x 87cm
AMICA Contributor: 
The Cleveland Museum of Art
Owner Location: 
Cleveland, Ohio, USA
ID Number: 
1998.103.1
Credit Line: 
John L. Severance Fund
Rights: 
Context: 
This set of prints was commissioned by the Chinese Qing dynasty Emperor Qianlong (ruled 1735?1796) to commemorate his army's suppression of the rebellions in China's Western Regions (modern Xingjiang pro-vince; also known as "Central Asia"). To each image, Qianlong added his own poem, indicating his apprec-iation and his pride in his military might. The emperor asked four Jesuit priests working at the Chinese court's art academy to depict the 16 scenes. Acknowledging the Western artists' ability to record the reality of events and the actions of figures, the request may also have been intended to make China's military strength known to the West. The prints are based on drawings that were made in China and then sent to France for etching and printing. The completed prints, a total of 200 sets, were sent back to China between 1772 and 1774. The calligraphy was added by means of woodblock printing.Qianlong asked four Jesuit priests working at the Chinese court's art academy to depict the 16 scenes. Acknowledging the Western artists' ability to record the reality of events and the actions of figures, the request may also have been intended to make China's military strength known to the West. The prints are based on drawings that were made in China and then sent to France for etching and printing. The com-pleted prints, a total of 200 sets, were sent back to China between 1772 and 1774. The calligraphy was added by means of woodblock printing.
Related Image Identifier Link: 
CMA_.1998.103.1.tif